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On the face of it, Ole Gunnar Solskjaer is making life easy for Manchester United’s owners, the Glazer family, and the Old Trafford chief executive Ed Woodward.

After all, things have been anything but easy since Sir Alex Ferguson retired in May 2013. David Moyes, Louis van Gaal and Jose Mourinho have all tried, and failed, to bring the good times back to the club.

Van Gaal and Mourinho won trophies, and United can still claim to have won more silverware over the past five years than Sunday’s opponents, Tottenham Hotspur, and Premier League leaders Liverpool, who have both won nothing during the post-Ferguson era.

But despite lifting the FA Cup, League Cup and Europa League, United have not been United since Ferguson left, and none of his full-time successors ever looked or felt like the right fit for a club which demands bold, attacking football from its players and managers.

So you can only imagine how relieved the Glazers and Woodward must feel right now to see caretaker-manager Solskjaer breathing new life into the team on the back of five straight victories since replacing the sacked Mourinho last month.

Appointing Solskjaer until the end of the season has proven to be a masterstroke. Not only has he kick-started an underperforming team and revived hopes of a top-four finish, the Norwegian has also restored the feel-good factor in and around the club by delivering the attacking, adventurous football that the supporters crave.

He has put a smile back on the faces of the previously unhappy Paul Pogba and Alexis Sanchez, handed Marcus Rashford the opportunities that Mourinho often appeared reluctant to provide and, all in all, Solskjaer has people at Old Trafford believing again.

So much so that there is now a growing sense that Solskjaer has put himself in pole position to secure the job of United’s manager on a permanent basis.

But there is always a caveat, and here it comes: What if the romantic notion of Solskjaer taking charge is flawed and based on nothing more than a fleeting honeymoon period?

Handing Solskjaer the keys to the manager’s office might feel like the easy option at this moment in time, and the right one, but such a crucial decision cannot be taken on the basis of wins against teams United would be expected to beat and a subsequent clamour on social media for the 45-year-old to be given the job.

 

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